More Than A Mother

What You Need to Know About Becoming a Freelance Writer and Author w/ Stacy Juba | Ep. 36

June 26, 2020 LaWann Moses, Stacy Juba Season 2
More Than A Mother
What You Need to Know About Becoming a Freelance Writer and Author w/ Stacy Juba | Ep. 36
Chapters
More Than A Mother
What You Need to Know About Becoming a Freelance Writer and Author w/ Stacy Juba | Ep. 36
Jun 26, 2020 Season 2
LaWann Moses, Stacy Juba

In this episode, Stacy Juba and I chatted about all things writing, editing, and publishing. This episode is perfect for anyone wanting to start a freelance writing business or finally get their book completed and become a published authors. 


What we learn in this episode:

  • How Stacy got started as a writer and now editor
  • How you can get started as a freelance writer
  • The difference between traditional and independent publishing
  • The different types of editing 
  • The steps you can take so you don't waste money during the editing process

Stacy Juba has written sweet and sassy chick lit novels, mysteries about determined women sleuths, and entertaining books for young adults and children. Her books include the Storybook Valley chick lit series and the Hockey Rivals young adult sports novels. Stacy is also a freelance developmental editor, online writing instructor, and an award-winning journalist. Her signature course, Book Editing Blueprint: A Step-By-Step Plan to Making Your Novels Publishable, empowers fiction writers to think like an editor so they can save time and money. She also runs the Shortcuts for Writers: Editing Made Simple group on Facebook.

Visit Stacy’s author website to read sample chapters of her books: http://stacyjuba.com/blog/

http://www.shortcutsforwriters.com

Visit the Shortcuts for Writers website to sign up for her free 5-day line editing class and to learn more about her signature course Book Editing Blueprint: http://www.shortcutsforwriters.com

You can connect with Stacy on social media:

Shortcuts for Writers: Editing Made Simple Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/shortcutsforwriters/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stacy-Juba/100155471301

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stacyjuba

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/stacy_juba/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYrgMQBA-1VkSyLxE_Itcaw


COMING JULY 1st
Are you tired of feeling stressed out, anxious and overwhelmed? Is chasing balance driving you crazy? How about that mom guilt monster always popping up and driving you crazy? Well, I have the solution for you COMING SOON! No longer will you have to feel overwhelmed and stressed but instead you can transform to a life of organization, freedom and contentment. Get connected to me at https://LaWannMoses.com so you will be among the first notified when this life changing program drops just for you. Goodbye Overwhelm, Hello Organization. COMING JULY 1st! Join the list and get notified now!

Stay connected with me on:
Website
Facebook
Instagram



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Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

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Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Stacy Juba and I chatted about all things writing, editing, and publishing. This episode is perfect for anyone wanting to start a freelance writing business or finally get their book completed and become a published authors. 


What we learn in this episode:

  • How Stacy got started as a writer and now editor
  • How you can get started as a freelance writer
  • The difference between traditional and independent publishing
  • The different types of editing 
  • The steps you can take so you don't waste money during the editing process

Stacy Juba has written sweet and sassy chick lit novels, mysteries about determined women sleuths, and entertaining books for young adults and children. Her books include the Storybook Valley chick lit series and the Hockey Rivals young adult sports novels. Stacy is also a freelance developmental editor, online writing instructor, and an award-winning journalist. Her signature course, Book Editing Blueprint: A Step-By-Step Plan to Making Your Novels Publishable, empowers fiction writers to think like an editor so they can save time and money. She also runs the Shortcuts for Writers: Editing Made Simple group on Facebook.

Visit Stacy’s author website to read sample chapters of her books: http://stacyjuba.com/blog/

http://www.shortcutsforwriters.com

Visit the Shortcuts for Writers website to sign up for her free 5-day line editing class and to learn more about her signature course Book Editing Blueprint: http://www.shortcutsforwriters.com

You can connect with Stacy on social media:

Shortcuts for Writers: Editing Made Simple Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/shortcutsforwriters/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stacy-Juba/100155471301

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stacyjuba

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/stacy_juba/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYrgMQBA-1VkSyLxE_Itcaw


COMING JULY 1st
Are you tired of feeling stressed out, anxious and overwhelmed? Is chasing balance driving you crazy? How about that mom guilt monster always popping up and driving you crazy? Well, I have the solution for you COMING SOON! No longer will you have to feel overwhelmed and stressed but instead you can transform to a life of organization, freedom and contentment. Get connected to me at https://LaWannMoses.com so you will be among the first notified when this life changing program drops just for you. Goodbye Overwhelm, Hello Organization. COMING JULY 1st! Join the list and get notified now!

Stay connected with me on:
Website
Facebook
Instagram



Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the show (http://paypal.me/lawannmoses)

[00:00:00] LaWann Moses: [00:00:00] Hey Stacey, how are you? 

[00:00:02] Stacy Juba: [00:00:02] Good. Thanks for having me. 

[00:00:04] LaWann Moses: [00:00:04] Thanks for being here. Welcome to the more than a mother show. I am so glad that you could join us today. 

[00:00:10] LaWann Moses: [00:00:10] Now, before we get started with the interview, can you please introduce yourself to my audience? 

[00:00:16] Stacy Juba: [00:00:16] Yeah. So I'm Stacy Juba and I'm a mom of two girls, and I'm also a fiction author of chicklet mystery novels, young adult books and couple of children's picture books. I'm also a freelance mental editor. I'm working with authors to strengthen their manuscripts, republication and I also have recently launched an online course, helping authors. Learn how to self edit their novels so that they can save some time and money on the editing process.

[00:00:48] That's 

[00:00:48] LaWann Moses: [00:00:48] awesome. And I love writing and I love fiction. So this is going to be great. So before we get started and learn more about your business and books and those types of things, as you know, here at more than a mother, we're all about helping moms receive their dreams while being great mothers at the same time.

[00:01:06] And with that being said, I believe that we all have powerful stories and that when we share our stories, we empower others to live their dreams and share their stories as well. So would you be able to share your story with my audience? Aha moment. Was that what led you to the path that you're on today? 

[00:01:25]Stacy Juba: [00:01:25] I think I had a couple of moments, like one, one.

[00:01:29] Teenager, and I just love to write. And there was this competition, it's called the Avon they're young. I don't know all the competition. And it was for teenage writers and it was offered every two years. And I remember reading. Tiger beat magazine. I always read teen beats.Kirk Cameron, and they had a, add in there, like with the previous year's winner. And they said that they would be, Opening up like submissions, like in the year. So I just kind of kept my eye on that cause they had, they had his picture and everything like that. That would be so cool to win that.

[00:02:12] And I would buy books printed by Avon and I would always like to go to the bookstore and I'd look in the back for the entry form. And then finally, one day I saw an entry form in the back of one of the books. I bought the book just for the entry form and I set my. Goal as I was going to write a book and enter it in this competition.

[00:02:32] And I wrote a book, he, I don't know all about hockey called based off and it, I submitted it and I found out like a year later they had won the competition. Oh, that's awesome. So that really sent me down the path of writing. I mean, I love to write. Then, but I kind of thought briefly of stopping writing.

[00:02:52] Cause it was just this so much for publication because there was so much rejection. I was, I was submitting even in high school, magazines and I got rejected a lot and I asked myself, do I really want to keep doing this? But then winning the competition, just kind of set me dad. Right. It was possible.

[00:03:10] And, that's a book that I had, that's still doing well even today. And I brought it back when it was out of print and I published SQL 25 years later. Oh, wow. Which was a couple of years ago. So that's a book that had a big impact on my life. And I think my second year, aha moment was, there was a lot of, despite that early success there 's a lot of years of rejection in between.

[00:03:34]I liked the benefit of professional editing on that particular manuscript because the editor at the publishing company worked with me to help make it publishable. But the manuscripts I wrote after that didn't have the benefit of professional editing. And I was still only like 18, 19 years old.

[00:03:47] So I had a lot to learn. So, If there was a lot of blood, sweat and tears years. And, there were some ups and downs. Like I had an agent and they had a lot of close calls at publishing companies, but there were also, I just, I just couldn't get that second book published. And so there was a point like when my, my oldest daughter, she was about.

[00:04:07] Too. And I was just seriously thinking, do I want to keep doing this? And I just don't know, but I've already put so many years into it. And so then it would be like, was all for nothing. And I entered, I was still writing, like when my parents would come over and babysit, I would still, I was still kind of writing and I had a couple of chapters that I decided to enter in this competition, another competition.

[00:04:30]yeah. And it was for mystery writers and, I just kind of sent it off, not really expecting anything. And then I got a phone call a few months later saying that I was one of the two winners and I had won a thousand dollars grant for my mystery novel. And they wanted me to come to the malice domestic conference in, outside of Washington, DC, which is where they had the Agatha award banquet.

[00:04:51] It's just like a big banquet in the mystery field of mystery authors. So, my husband and I went and I actually wound up becoming very close friends with the other grant winner. And I, it was just a great experience. I just kind of really revitalized me. It reminded me of why I was working so hard and I still have this dream and you know, that it was still worth pursuing.

[00:05:12] And then shortly after that, I. got her contract for my first mystery novel. And then that's like when I launched my website and kind of, started getting other books published and that's when I, shortly after that, I brought back face off. I brought that into print in my book. I had published when I was 18.

[00:05:30] So I say those two moments just really kind of defined like where I am now. Yeah. 

[00:05:34] LaWann Moses: [00:05:34] Those are great. And I mean, just the fact that it sounds like early on, you discovered what your passion was and. He being that young teenager, you knew that you wanted to write and doing those entries into tiger beat and those types of things.

[00:05:48] So where you actually won the competition and then just staying with it through, I know you mentioned a lot of blood, sweat and tears, because back then the publishing industry is nothing as it is today. I mean, a lot of things have evolved and changed. So I just couldn't imagine, like with all the rejection and everything, how did you just keep going?

[00:06:06] Like when you were receiving those rejections. How did you just navigate through that and just find the will to keep going? 

[00:06:12] Stacy Juba: [00:06:12] I think just knowing that it was possible, that kept me going because I, unfortunately, even though I had had that first early success, after that I had even written this SQL to face off, but the there's a lot of turnover at that book, couplers and company and all the editors I've worked with left.

[00:06:28] So they would reach a point where I was just getting formed letter form letters from them and they really didn't know, have an idea who I was, but I had received some. fan mails from kids that had enjoyed my book. So I think just knowing that it was possible, I did some book signings and everything to that kind of kept me going for a while, but then it was hard because sometimes it would be like just a.

[00:06:49] Form letter where it was just, you know, it didn't say anything positive. And then other times there would be like a nugget of information, you know, like we think you have a lot of potential really enjoyed this, not for us, but you might want to consider fleshing out your main character more. So those rejections were really valuable because I kind of would put them all together and take that feedback and keep rewriting and rewriting to make the book stronger.

[00:07:15]And then finally I got an agent and that was, they kind of mentored me and I learned a lot there, but I think the hardest rejections were the really close calls because I had a couple, I had have few like, really tough ones, like where there was, for example, one of them, there was an editor at I young adult paranormal publishing company and.

[00:07:35] I had a young adult paranormal paranormal book that would be perfect for them. And the editor and their publishing committee said that she really enjoyed it. They gave me a couple pages of feedback and said, if you B write and submit, how would you feel about resubmitting it? If you, if you.

[00:07:53] Decide to follow our suggestions. And I said, sure it, sorry, it's been a few months rewriting ed. And, then about a week before I was finished, the editor just kind of sent out a generic email to everyone, all the, all the author's shoes on her list, and that she'd been in contact with saying she was leaving the company and leaving publishing.

[00:08:11] But yeah, she said my assistant editor is going to be taking over as editor and you can send everything to him. So I was disappointed, but I still had all of them to that hope. And then I submitted it to him and he returned it on red the same day. He put it right back in the envelope and say, we're no longer doing young adult paranormal books.

[00:08:32] Wow. So I just had all my hopes resting on it, just so much work. And so, It just seemed like it was, it really thought it was going to happen. And there were a few instances like that, where it was so close and then it didn't pan out. And I think that was hardest where you get, where you just get your hopes up and then you stop and then you're waiting for the phone to ring.

[00:08:53] LaWann Moses: [00:08:53] that that applies to a lot of different things that, I mean, but the good part is even like you were saying what the rejection meant. There was a lot of feedback. So with that feedback that you are receiving, you are able to go in and make edits, edits, and tweak things and kind of make your book stronger.

[00:09:11] So even through the rejections, it was helping you become a stronger writer. So that now. Fast forward down the line, you are able to do right. All these books that have all this success and those types of things. So right after we said that, even when it feels like it's bad news, it's not always bad news because you can learn from that.

[00:09:29] Stacy Juba: [00:09:29] And that particular book was my book that I eventually on indie published dark before Dawn and I used all their feedback to make it better. So it was beneficial. It did help to make it a stronger book at the time, it was kind of like, Oh, Yeah, why can't it be easy? Right. 

[00:09:47] LaWann Moses: [00:09:47] So when you're going through, like with the rejections and you learned all this, and now it's got you to a point to where you're able to build, right.

[00:09:56] You're independently published and do all this other outside work. So when you're in that moment, how did you feel these lessons from the past have helped you with what you're doing right 

[00:10:08] Stacy Juba: [00:10:08] now? Oh, I think definitely it's helped me as an editor. So, about five or six years ago, I decided that I wanted to.

[00:10:18] I had been doing a lot of freelance writing when my kids were younger and then I decided to branch out and do some freelance developmental editing to kind of earn some money on the side. And I, it's just kind of amazing to me. Cause if I looked back, you know, when I was 18 years old, I got this 10 page letter on face-off from the editor, which is telling me all of these issues, the book that even though they wanted to publish it, they wanted me to totally be ready to make it even stronger.

[00:10:46] And I was still intimidated. Back then. And then over the years I would get all these rejection letters. Well, you know, those little nuggets of information with, from feedback. So it was kind of amazing to me that now I had learned enough over the years that I was able to pick up on these things and manage stress and that I was able to, like I could look at a manuscript and.

[00:11:07]edit and now I tend to send out like eight to 10 page single space. And I think coming from an author's background, I'm always really careful that I don't want to, even though I want to make sure that they understand that. They want the book to be publishable. It takes a lot of hard work, right?

[00:11:27] Putting it's a product and you're putting it up. You're putting it up on Amazon. If people review email, you want it to be strong or it's in, if you want to proceed the traditional publishing route to get an agent again, it's very competitive. So you have to make sure that your book really stands out.

[00:11:43] So it's a lot of, If you don't want writing to be a hobby, if you want it to be something that it's like a job that you really do have to put the effort into it, but I'm also sorry, it's just kind of like a fine line. We're trying to make the authors, beginner, authors realize that, but while also trying to encourage them.

[00:12:00] And so I think coming from that background myself, where I would get these letters and feel overwhelmed, I know what it feels like. So I try to always find something positive to say and just try to shape it in a way so that hopefully they'll. Feel inspired to keep going and take that 

[00:12:17] LaWann Moses: [00:12:17] step. Well, that's good.

[00:12:19] So you did mention in that, that you did freelance writing where your children were younger. So it's probably with every, all the craziness that we have going on right now. And people just trying to figure out what. Their next step is, and those types of things here, just talk about what your experience was with freelance writing and how someone could perhaps get into that.

[00:12:39] Stacy Juba: [00:12:39] Yeah. so my background was as a newspaper reporter. So before my kid, before I had my kids, I was a newspaper reporter for several years. And then I. Left newspapers. And I went to work for a company like a nonprofit organization where they had events for high school teachers and kind of educational events in the first, the student leaders.

[00:13:02] So, I did their wellness newsletter and I did some press releases. So that kinda gave me the background. and then, when my daughter was younger, I stayed with her, with that company that I've been working for just on a freelance basis. Where I just did work from home doing their newsletter. and I did that for about, probably about eight years.

[00:13:24] No, it, yeah, it was probably about eight years. So, I would just go like a few times a year to their different events and take notes and, write, write up the newsletter. And my husband is actually a graphic designer. He's high school graphic design teachers, or he would get paid to design it. And then through that, I had met somebody else who had come to one of their conferences.

[00:13:45]and they were from a health organization, they are very small out of their house, educational, like melanoma foundation. And they have invited me to do some freelance work for them. So then I did that for a couple of years, in addition, Where I would write press releases. And just to, we did a newsletter again.

[00:14:03] I wrote it, my husband designed it. And, so I've worked with them doing outreach for a couple of years. And then, There was also a parenting magazine, a regional parenting magazine that I had just seen, like I was always reading it. It was always like at the doctor's office or at the grocery store.

[00:14:17] So, I pitched them articles to them. They just had, I just contacted the editor through her email address and I wound up doing several articles for them. Over the years. And then I also had a client that was somebody I had met years ago when I was a newspaper reporter, who is a director of public relations at a regional hospital in the area.

[00:14:38] And, so I also, I still do this actually, a couple of times a year where I. She'll assign me a few articles to write and I interview patients and it to be doctors. And it's just kind of about, it's a magazine that gets sent out to all the homes in the area. So I'd say I recommend if you don't have that writing background or those context, just kind of, look to your path connections.

[00:15:00] Cause a lot of these stuff like the hospital and the melanoma foundation and the, you know, the, Other newsletter. I was doing those all came from like people I had met over the years. You could just kind of go to contact past connections and say, you're looking to do some freelance writing. Is there anything they need help with like a newspaper newsletter articles, press releases it's meant to the newspaper or, you know, are there any magazines or newspapers in your area you could contact?

[00:15:27] Like there's lots of regional parenting magazines are often looking for, For freelance writers. And then once you build a relationship with them, that tend to come to you or they'll say, Hey, we have this idea for a story. Are you interested? So, I guess so there's definitely blogs and everything.

[00:15:43] Now there's no shortage of places to write. 

[00:15:45] LaWann Moses: [00:15:45] Internet's like the land of opportunity right now, but I think that's good where you're saying reach out to past connections that speaks to the importance of networking and making those connections that you have people to reach out field and also pitching like.

[00:15:58] Publications and things that are looking for content and looking at the editors and try to build those relationships. That one day they're reaching back and asking you, Hey, do you want to write this for us? So I think that's really good, 

[00:16:10] Stacy Juba: [00:16:10] right? There's so many like, mom and entrepreneur groups, like on Facebook and everything, and sometimes you'll see these collaborations.

[00:16:17] That's where they wait. They might even, somebody might even say, Hey, I'm looking for somebody to write this or design this. Okay. You know, so it's, I think it's good to just kind of consider yourself an entrepreneur, even if you don't know you haven't really established yet, but kind of think of yourself.

[00:16:33] That's one and look for those opportunities to network, because I think that's how a lot of, a lot of these collaborations and relationships happen. 

[00:16:40] LaWann Moses: [00:16:40] Yeah. That is so true. Now you've had a long span writing career and so. Once when you first started, there was a lot with traditional publishing and now there's a lot with self publishing.

[00:16:53] And since you've kind of been on both sides, can you speak to, I guess, how, how you've watched things change and evolve and what your experience has been with now in the present with the traditional public? I sing, I guess, in self publishing. 

[00:17:08] Stacy Juba: [00:17:08] Yeah. Yeah. It's, I mean, it's like a whole different landscape than when I first started.

[00:17:13] So the benefits of traditional publishing, I mean there's pros and cons to both, but for example, with traditional publishing, with a large publisher, like the one that I've worked with originally, I mean, they'll send your book out to, to big review places such as publishes weekly or library journals.

[00:17:29] We'll leverage on that. Those are much harder to get into if you're an indie writer and a lot of bookstores and libraries make buying decisions from thing reviews like that. So it's a lot easier to get your books into, Into libraries and bookstores. If you have a ch if you're working with a large traditional publisher, it's very, very difficult to get your book into libraries and bookstores like chain bookstores, independent bookstores, if you're indie publishing.

[00:17:58]so that's like the one that I've been. And then, a lot of times with a traditional publisher you'll get like an advance. So you'll earn some money upfront. and. you know, they obviously they do the cover and they work with you a bit on editing. although you, a lot of authors, even if they, even if they have contracts with traditional publishers, like I've worked with some clients that will still hire me or hire someone as a freelance editor before they send the manuscript to the editor that they have a contract with at the publishing house, just because they want, editors at the publishing company house, they just don't have as much.

[00:18:29] Time or they don't have, they don't have as much staff as they did years ago to work with you, you know, really, and in depth on your editing. So they want to make their manuscript as strong as possible before it gets there. So they can kind of be thought of as an author who turns in like a really well developed clean copy.

[00:18:46] So, and then the. Pros and cons of, like indie publishing. I mean, regardless, you still have to market your book. I mean, even if you have a contract with a, a traditional publisher, you still have to do a lot of marketing. You really still need to have a website and, differences I feel with a traditional publisher, you may be doing more events like bookstores, kind of traveling more.

[00:19:10] It's probably on your own budget. Cause they're not there unless you're a well known author. They're not going to. Not really give you much of a promotional budget. You'd still be sending up a live these yourself. And, whereas with indie publishing, you can, if it's my schedule and better, because I can, I'm my mom and I don't want to be doing a lot of traveling.

[00:19:29] I can, I just kind of focus a lot of my efforts on online marketing. So I do, and I like being an entrepreneur. I like indie publishing where I can have control over the price and I can have sales when I want to. so there's a lot of ad companies you can, buy ads with, and S sometimes they're expensive.

[00:19:53] So you kind of have to. They are very selective where they will only select books that they think are strong enough to have like good covers and that have a lot of reviews. So you have to really build up your reviews and make sure that your book is prudent. It's professional, if you're indie publishing, but, you know, assume you've done that, then you can just kind of control the price and.

[00:20:15] Right. You can just do lots of networking with other authors where there's different events you can sign up for, like industry L's where everybody discounts the book and then cross promotes or newsletter swaps with other authors. Very yeah. Promote each other's books in your newsletter. So there's lots of different ways you can market the book, but it is to make money on it.

[00:20:37] You do really have to get it out there and just realize that just because you publish it, it's it. It's not. Can I sell a lot of copies unless you're telling people about it, but that's the drawback of indie polishing is that, whereas you have a good to get some sales from, with the publisher out marketing for you, but they will help to some degree, for indie posting.

[00:20:56] It's just you. So you have to really work hard. so I do some Amazon ads, Like for my hockey books. And that really helps cause it just kind of they'll show it, show my ads to, to like people who are searching like for other, if they're doing a search for like another similar kind of book, like a CSUN young adult sports book or something, then my ad will kind of pop up with the list of, with the other recommended.

[00:21:21] Books for them to check out and I sell a lot of books that way. So there's just different things we have to do to try and see what works. What works. Yeah. What works. One book might not work for another book. 

[00:21:32] LaWann Moses: [00:21:32] And as you mentioned, there are pros and cons with really anything you do. And each one has their own benefits, as well as the constitute as well.

[00:21:41] And it really, I guess it depends on what you're looking for when you're, what your purpose is and what you're looking forward to do. That sounds like self publishing, as you said, gives you that. Flexibility to kind of make your own kind of schedule and have more control, but whereas traditional publishing could get you in those bigger, like stores and chains and those types of things.


[00:22:02] Stacy Juba: [00:22:02] So, yeah, it's really all one thing. I found that. So that might be interesting to like moms or stay at home moms who are looking to kind of work from home and a lot of authors like indie authors. Have kind of like once they start the process, they kind of learn what their strengths are. So some might find that they're really good with cover design and kind of learn more about that.

[00:22:24] And then they become, like, in addition to writing books, they become freelance cover designers or summer find that they really are good at formatting like. As an ebook and then they become formatters. And I, that I was, I liked the editing. I liked the big developmental editing side, but, where I kind of give an overview of the manuscript, but some, some might be really good at the grammar and punctuation and become like copy editors or proofreaders.

[00:22:53] So, Even though it's hard to kind of make a living from your books at first, unless you're really prolific and writing a lot of books, the series you might find once you kind of start exploring that indie publishing world, that there are other opportunities that, you know, it just kind of find what your strengths and interests are.

[00:23:10] Right. You know, do something else to kind of piggybacks off of that. That's kind of related. So, right. 

[00:23:16] LaWann Moses: [00:23:16] So I know you mentioned the different types of editing, so I know that you do developmental editing, then there's like proofreading and there's copy editing. So how do those differ from each other?

[00:23:28] Stacy Juba: [00:23:28] Yeah, so developmental editing, that is where someone would send me a manuscript and I just, I give like a broad overview. So I'm looking if it's a fiction manuscript, for example, I'm looking at the characters. Are they well rounded? Do they have a character archetype? Did they change from the beginning to the end of the book, they all fleshed out the plot like this, a story, keep moving forward.

[00:23:52] Is there enough conflict and obstacles? How was it resolved? The point of view? This is a big area where a lot of beginner writers have trouble. you know, are they staying in there? Main character's point of view, are they hopping into other characters without getting into deep enough so that we really get to know this character, like dialogue now, pacing, perfect.

[00:24:16] And setting that up more with the manuscript that is. Like by a more advanced author, that's further along because, if, if an author has like a lot of bigger issues that they have to deal with that if I have to do a lot of rewriting, it does make some sense for me to like line edit or, you know, their whole manuscript is going to be changing a lot anyway, then I'm able to do more focusing on the line editing, which it is creative as opposed to copy editing, which copy editing is more like about grammar and punctuation. And, so I don't do a lot of copy editing. Basically. I, if it's a manuscript, that's really where the author is really good with grammar.

[00:24:55] And then I'll do it. Correct comments and things like that. And that might be enough. They may not need to hire a copy editor, but I also see a lot of manuscripts, where the authors just have a lot of trouble with, with commas and grammar and punctuation, like how to punctuate dialog, where, you know, where do you put your periods like inside and outside, where they, have a lot of.

[00:25:18] Run on sentences and complete sentences. That's like a copy editor. Would you say once you've hired a developmental editor, the developmental editor would send them like a long letter explaining giving this big, broad overview. So I might say I'm okay. You know, you have a problem with grammar and punctuation, and here are some resources, but, you know, I recommend that after you do all your rewrites and, you want to hire a copy editor, it's the next step.

[00:25:43]you know, I'll do some mock up. They may just get, yeah. So the copy of it would be the next step. And that's like where they look at the grammar and the punctuation. And they might look for things like continuity, like this year. I color some days I color change. 

[00:25:57] LaWann Moses: [00:25:57] Okay. Well that's yeah, that's good to know.

[00:25:59] Yeah. A lot of people throw out the word, like when they go into an editor, like we see a lot of freelance businesses and things like that. Pop up, you see a lot of people say that they're editors, but it's not clear, like a lot of times. Okay. What type of editor are you? So I think. When people are looking at what their strengths or weaknesses are, it's important to know that there are many different types of editors and depending on which type you are, it's a different title and you have different strengths.

[00:26:25] So thank you for explaining that. 

[00:26:28] Stacy Juba: [00:26:28] Yeah, and you definitely want to, I always recommend starting with a developmental editor. and it depends on what you write. If you're writing like fiction or nonfiction memoirs, like some off some, some that it's not developmental letters, we'll do all of that or some specialized and like more fiction or nonfiction.

[00:26:44] So you just want to make sure that year is working with an editor that is comfortable with the genre. Like, for example, I don't really. Do I don't edit picture books when they are really young and children's books, or they don't feel that's my strength, but like, I'll do like, I'll do most other fiction. I'll do some like nonfiction.

[00:27:02] I've done self help books and memoirs and that kind of thing. But every, I think a lot of our editors just have their specialties and to harness or feel comfortable with. So it's always good to check prices, check their testimonials and kind of make sure that they be a good match for you. So I'd say, always start with the developmental editor first, because a lot of authors, new authors, think that the manuscript only needs copy editing.

[00:27:28] They just kind of think that all it needs is like comments and somebody to kind of go through and touch all their mistakes. But that's very rarely the case. Most manuscripts need a lot of, especially for newer writers, they need a lot of. Developmental is probably a lot more to fix. And you might realize 

[00:27:47] LaWann Moses: [00:27:47] So with developmental editing, so that's, you mentioned you're doing, you're also doing something new with this new class, in course, that you're doing. Can you explain to us what that is about? 

[00:28:01] Stacy Juba: [00:28:01] Yeah. So I recently launched a course called book editing blueprint, a step by step plan to making your novels publishable.

[00:28:08] And I had been working on that for a couple of years. And what I was finding was that a lot of authors were sending them mini scripts, to me burly and editing is expensive. I think the average rates for developmental editing? I think it was 45, according to the finance at a toilet, editorial freelancers association.

[00:28:31]I think the rates were like 45 to $55 an hour for Dartmouth editing or something in that range. And that accounts for like one to five pages an hour. So if you have like a 300 page manuscript, Oh, wow. Are you paying like $55 an hour? That's going to be very expensive. And as I said, like most beginner authors and we'll need several rounds of editing.

[00:28:53] So you kind of multiply that by quite a few. You need four rounds of editing five rounds. I've worked with some beginners who really had never written anything before. and. They might've needed even up to like eight rounds of editing. Cause they were just starting like with no background and writing whatsoever.

[00:29:11] So, and even like some intermediate writers who've been writing a while and working with editors typically even they need like two to three rounds of developmental editing. And then just the more experienced you get, like an advanced writer might just need one round or two rounds. So it was just kind of the more experienced you get the list you need.

[00:29:29] And then that doesn't count. Like if you need to hire a copy editor, if you need an entire proofreader, some authors just have a lot of difficulty with grammar and punctuation and proofreading and to make their book publishable, they will have to hire all three. And so again, this is, that can be very expensive.

[00:29:44] so I was basically finding that there was that. I would get these manuscripts that just had so much work to do now the long road ahead of them was an expensive road. And I just thought that there had to be a better way. Like, like there was sort of like, there was no middle ground, like I'm finished with like finishing a manuscript.

[00:30:05] They revise it to the best that they can. And then they'd go right to hiring an editor, investing hundreds of dollars in editing and. There were just so many mistakes that I was seeing that they could learn to fix themselves if they knew what to look for. Cause I, cause everybody was making the same mistakes.

[00:30:23] Like I, I have a file on my computer where I would just copy and paste into the letters like, Oh, this author's showing, I'm telling, not showing. So let me paste my paragraph on, on that. So, and then like, or this is I'm overusing, all these words, like look and walk and the same words that everybody else has overused.

[00:30:42] Same words I used to overuse. Cause I mean, it's, it's, it's just, I'd be writing basically. It's me the same. Do the same mistakes and book. So I decided to create a class that would just kind of give an overview of every, of all these mistakes that we're seeing in every manuscript and kind of giving them an overview of, so they would get like a solid foundation.

[00:31:05] And, you know, thinking like a development editor and then, and then I take them through, kind of evaluating their own manuscript. Like there's a workbook where they ask some questions in each of these main categories, so they can evaluate the manuscript and figure out what their weaknesses are and what their strengths are.

[00:31:22] And then there's some practice. Exercises and interactive quizzes. So it just really helps to take their manuscript to the next level. And then they can go through the self editing checklist too, and use that in conjunction with their workbook to just go through their manuscript and let's give it a solid rewrite. I decided to create this course too, just give them a foundation and think like an editor and know what they should evaluate on their own before. Actually investing money and hiring an editor.

[00:31:55]so it has 10 modules and it kind of gives them a foundation and things like characters and dialogue plot. And I just take them through all the most common mistakes and. This is also a section on the smaller things like line editing, like how they can tighten the writing and what are the overuse words that they should be limiting and how they can make their tendencies more vivid and structured.

[00:32:23] And then it's also some lessons on copy editing where it's not going to replace the need to hire a copy editor. They have trouble with grammar and punctuation. But it will show them the most common mistakes that I see. And I talk a lot about software that they can use to kind of run some spell and grammar checks, to cut down on the hours and, and teach them, lead them through some of the most common mistakes and to, they can.

[00:32:49] You're at where their weaknesses are. And even if they, even if they can, just get better at a few of those. Yeah. That will help them clean up their manuscript and it could save money and pay rounds of editing the copy editor down the line. So, basically they watch some videos and read some lessons, do some interactive quizzes and some practice worksheets, and then they fill out a workbook that helps them to evaluate the manuscript for each of these areas.

[00:33:18] And so basically they'll have written themselves an in depth editorial letter. Telling them everything that they need to work on in their rewrite. And then there's a 25 page, self editing checklist at the end of the course that they can use just to go through it step by step to make sure they're not overlooking anything.

[00:33:34] And then once they, yeah. So once they've gone through that checklist and kind of use that in conjunction with their notes that they made in their workbook, then if they, once they feel that they've. Gone as far as they can on their own, then it's time to hire an editor. And hopefully that will have saved them some money in those really early rounds of editing.

[00:33:53]so that the money that they'll be putting into it, they'll get a more advanced, higher level edit, as in telling them to go back to the drawing board because they made all these beginner mistakes. And then you just kind of use that for book after book and hopefully that the writing and editing process should get easier 

[00:34:10] LaWann Moses: [00:34:10] yeah. Okay. That's really good. So what would you say has been the most rewarding part of your journey so far? 

[00:34:18]Stacy Juba: [00:34:18] Well I think my masterpieces or my, my children that's been the most reported being a mom has been the most rewarding part of it. I think it's also, being able to, Be still doing what I was doing when I was a teenager, just pursuing the passion that I've always had and finding ways to make a living as a writer, doing something that I love to do.

[00:34:43] So I hope that I set a positive example for my kids to, you know, to choose a career path. That is something that they're passionate about and are interested in. you know, cause I think that's, that's just always. Certainly, well, I even met my husband working for a newspaper, so writing, also, then meta led me to that.

[00:35:03] So it has just had such an influence on my life and I feel like I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing. And that, teaching was like the next logical step for me, like, based on my. Based on my years as an author. 

[00:35:15] LaWann Moses: [00:35:15] Okay. Yeah, that's really great. So if you could offer one tip to a mom who may want to do writing a, be a freelance writer, being an author, and she's struggling to figure out like the first step to take or where to start, what is a tip that you could offer to that mom?

 [00:35:31] Stacy Juba: [00:35:31] [00:35:32]I would say just kind of figure out what your, what you're interested in writing about, whether it's a, like a novel or a, if articles, you know, what, what are you interested in writing about? And then just kind of jump into it. Start, start writing something. If you want to write like articles like freelancing, it's good to build up some clips.

[00:35:51] So like maybe you want to offer some. Free articles, just some blogs or local publications. It just kind of starts small with some clips and tissue just so that you can show, perspective editor, like at a publication that you have some writing experience and then just, you can query different publications with their ideas.

[00:36:13] Just kind of set your sights on, on some that are in an area. Like a topic you feel comfortable writing about, like, for example, if it was parenting or if it's something related to it career, you had, find some publications that are geared toward that. And then just, to just go for it, just, you know, if there may be some rejections, but, You know that that's something that every writer faces and eventually if you keep working hard enough, you'll get, he'll get past that.

[00:36:42] And start I'll let you take it if there are con couple of good connections, and then you might actually find somebody that likes a long term client that will send you a word. And then if you're wanting to write books, Again, find what you don't just write something that you think is going to sell because it's trendy.

[00:36:57] Like all my books that I've written, I feel I've always felt passionate about them and excited. So write about something that makes you excited, read books in that genre and just kind of learn as much as you can about the craft of writing and, in this lots of groups, for example, on Facebook with writers, I think it's good to network with other writers and.

[00:37:17] Just to be around other writers who, you know, who, who understand, like wanting to make up characters can spend hours, you know, just by yourself, like making up these stories. I have a group on Facebook called the shortcuts for writers and I didn't make simple groups. and welcome to check that out. It's a very supportive, international community of writers of all different levels.

[00:37:38] So I think if you can kind of, even if you don't have like other writers in your. Community, if there's no writing groups or anything like that, there's just try to find a couple of groups online where you can, Be around other authors who are pursuing the same goals and that can help inspire you.

[00:37:56] LaWann Moses: [00:37:56] Right. Well, thank you so much for that. So I know you mentioned your Facebook group. Can you just tell us where our audience can find you online? 

[00:38:04] Stacy Juba: [00:38:04] Yep. So, They can go to Stacey juba.com and there they can find out about my books and just kind of get an overview of everything. And then I also have for writers, I have a special website, the short cuts for writers website, and they go there.

[00:38:20] They, if they're interested in writing that tells us about my editing services, gets a link to my Facebook group. And I also have a free five day line editing class. You can sign up for, called line editing made simple. And, so they could set up for that. So, I'm on Instagram and Twitter everywhere.

[00:38:38] So a YouTube channel. So if they go to those two websites, they'll find me everywhere. 

[00:38:42] LaWann Moses: [00:38:42] So, okay. And we'll be sure to link to that in the show notes so that everyone can find you easily. Well, I thank you for joining me today, Stacy, this was really great, and I learned a lot more about writing and editing and all that.

[00:38:54] So I appreciate you joining me. 

[00:38:56] Stacy Juba: [00:38:56] Yeah, thanks for having me. It was fun. 

[00:38:58] LaWann Moses: [00:38:58] Thank you.